Annual Symposium

Gender Identity and Sexuality after Obergefell

Friday, February 26 | Monday, February 29 | Tuesday, March 1 | Thursday, March 3

The Duke Journal of Gender, Law & Policy’s 2016 Spring Symposium will discuss theories of sexuality, gender identity, and gender expression and the implications of the Supreme Court’s decision in Obergefell v. Hodges.

2016 Poster

Friday, February 26  |  Room 4055  |  12:30-1:30pm

“Perceiving Orientation: Defining Sexuality After Obergefell”

Mary Ziegler, Stearns Weaver Miller Professor, Florida State University College of Law

Mary Ziegler is the Stearns, Weaver, Miller Professor at Florida State University College of Law. In addition to more than twenty articles on the legal history of reproduction and sexuality, she is the author of After Roe: The Lost History of the Abortion Debate, published by Harvard University Press in 2015. For After Roe, she is the recipient of the biannual Thomas J. Wilson Prize for the best first book published by the press in any discipline.

 

Monday, February 29  |  Room 3043  |  12:30-1:30pm

“Marriage Equality and Obergefell’s Generational (Not Glucksberg’s Traditional) Due Process Clause”

Ronald Turner, Alumnae Law Center Professor of Law, The University of Houston Law Center

Ronald Turner is the Alumnae Law Center Professor of Law at the University of Houston Law Center.  He has authored and co-authored several books, including employment discrimination and torts casebooks, and has published more than 90 articles addressing labor and employment and constitutional law issues in academic journals.  He received his B.A.  From Wilberforce University and his J.D. From the University of Pennsylvania Law School.  He is a member of the American Law Institute and a fellow of the American Bar Foundation.  Prior to joining the Houston faculty he was a faculty member at the University of Alabama School of Law.  He has also served as a visiting professor at the College of William & Mary Marshall-Wythe School of Law, and as visiting professor of history at Rice University.

 

Tuesday, March 1  |  Room 3043  |  12:30-1:30pm

“The ‘Straight’ Faces of Same-Sex Marriage”

Scott Skinner-Thompson, Acting Assistant Professor, New York University School of Law

Scott Skinner-Thompson is an Acting Assistant Professor at NYU School of Law, where his research focuses on privacy and anti-discrimination, with a particular focus on LGBTQ and HIV issues.  His most recent article, “Outing Privacy,” was published in the Northwestern University Law Review. Scott is the editor and contributing author of AIDS and the Law (Aspen, 5th ed., 2015), one of the leading resources in the field. His shorter commentary has appeared in Slate, The New Republic, and elsewhere. In 2014, he was selected as one of the Best LGBT Lawyers Under 40 by the National LGBT Bar Association. Scott graduated from Duke Law School, magna cum laude and Order of the Coif, in 2008, receiving both a J.D. and LL.M in International & Comparative Law.

 

Thursday, March 3  |  Room 3043  |  12:30-1:30pm

“Gender Essentialism and American Law: Why and How to Sever the Connection”

Dr. Melina Bell, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Law, Washington & Lee University

Dr. Melina Constantine Bell is an Associate Professor of Philosophy and Law at Washington and Lee University.  She joined the philosophy department in 2005 and became Associate Professor in 2011.  She was appointed Associate Professor of Law (by Courtesy) at the law school in 2015.  She is a core faculty member in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program and an affiliate faculty member in the Shepherd Program for the Interdisciplinary Study of Poverty and Human Capability.

Professor Bell’s primary research interests are in political philosophy, philosophy of law, and feminist philosophy.  Her publications have focused on several different ways in which the basic structure of society, or particular domains within it, reflect hierarchies of social power that unduly restrict human freedom and opportunity and impede human flourishing.

 

Food will be served. For more information or questions, please contact Christine Kim at cik2@duke.edu.

Archive

Information on past symposiums can be found here.

Annual Symposium

Gender Identity and Sexuality after Obergefell

Friday, February 26 | Monday, February 29 | Tuesday, March 1 | Thursday, March 3

The Duke Journal of Gender, Law & Policy’s 2016 Spring Symposium will discuss theories of sexuality, gender identity, and gender expression and the implications of the Supreme Court’s decision in Obergefell v. Hodges.

2016 Poster

Friday, February 26  |  Room 4055  |  12:30-1:30pm

“Perceiving Orientation: Defining Sexuality After Obergefell”

Mary Ziegler, Stearns Weaver Miller Professor, Florida State University College of Law

Mary Ziegler is the Stearns, Weaver, Miller Professor at Florida State University College of Law. In addition to more than twenty articles on the legal history of reproduction and sexuality, she is the author of After Roe: The Lost History of the Abortion Debate, published by Harvard University Press in 2015. For After Roe, she is the recipient of the biannual Thomas J. Wilson Prize for the best first book published by the press in any discipline.

 

Monday, February 29  |  Room 3043  |  12:30-1:30pm

“Marriage Equality and Obergefell’s Generational (Not Glucksberg’s Traditional) Due Process Clause”

Ronald Turner, Alumnae Law Center Professor of Law, The University of Houston Law Center

Ronald Turner is the Alumnae Law Center Professor of Law at the University of Houston Law Center.  He has authored and co-authored several books, including employment discrimination and torts casebooks, and has published more than 90 articles addressing labor and employment and constitutional law issues in academic journals.  He received his B.A.  From Wilberforce University and his J.D. From the University of Pennsylvania Law School.  He is a member of the American Law Institute and a fellow of the American Bar Foundation.  Prior to joining the Houston faculty he was a faculty member at the University of Alabama School of Law.  He has also served as a visiting professor at the College of William & Mary Marshall-Wythe School of Law, and as visiting professor of history at Rice University.

 

Tuesday, March 1  |  Room 3043  |  12:30-1:30pm

“The ‘Straight’ Faces of Same-Sex Marriage”

Scott Skinner-Thompson, Acting Assistant Professor, New York University School of Law

Scott Skinner-Thompson is an Acting Assistant Professor at NYU School of Law, where his research focuses on privacy and anti-discrimination, with a particular focus on LGBTQ and HIV issues.  His most recent article, “Outing Privacy,” was published in the Northwestern University Law Review. Scott is the editor and contributing author of AIDS and the Law (Aspen, 5th ed., 2015), one of the leading resources in the field. His shorter commentary has appeared in Slate, The New Republic, and elsewhere. In 2014, he was selected as one of the Best LGBT Lawyers Under 40 by the National LGBT Bar Association. Scott graduated from Duke Law School, magna cum laude and Order of the Coif, in 2008, receiving both a J.D. and LL.M in International & Comparative Law.

 

Thursday, March 3  |  Room 3043  |  12:30-1:30pm

“Gender Essentialism and American Law: Why and How to Sever the Connection”

Dr. Melina Bell, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Law, Washington & Lee University

Dr. Melina Constantine Bell is an Associate Professor of Philosophy and Law at Washington and Lee University.  She joined the philosophy department in 2005 and became Associate Professor in 2011.  She was appointed Associate Professor of Law (by Courtesy) at the law school in 2015.  She is a core faculty member in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program and an affiliate faculty member in the Shepherd Program for the Interdisciplinary Study of Poverty and Human Capability.

Professor Bell’s primary research interests are in political philosophy, philosophy of law, and feminist philosophy.  Her publications have focused on several different ways in which the basic structure of society, or particular domains within it, reflect hierarchies of social power that unduly restrict human freedom and opportunity and impede human flourishing.

 

Food will be served. For more information or questions, please contact Christine Kim at cik2@duke.edu.

Archive

Information on past symposiums can be found here.